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What are the difference between Git Push and Git Push Origin?

Let us go back to the older time when there were no emails or any other modern technology. You are writing a letter sitting in your room to your dear ones in the mild glistening candle night. In the end, you write your name, folds it up, and put the same into an envelope. This is the stage where you commit that letter is finalized and ready to push to the destination. For this purpose, you have to go to the post office and send that letter to the receiver.

Now, come to the modern world where you are using emails in place of letters. So, replace the word letter with the word file and try to understand the concept again. When you are working on a file, it is saved on your local machine, and it can be edited as many times as you want before the final delivery. Once changes are complete, add your digital signature in the end and push changes to the remote directory by putting essential credentials over it. Here is the pictorial representation how these two GIT commands work.

Git Push vs. Git Push Origin

In easy words, every time changes are made, they are saved to the local computer and you can make changes plenty of times before pushing them to the destination. till the time, changes are saved on the local system, it will not affect the receiver. So, you have to extra careful before changes are committed and pushed to the destination. I would suggest checking them twice and push later using two popular GIT commands, Git Push and Git Push Origin. Here is a quick comparison of the two commands for your understanding.

Git Push vs. Git Push Origin

Git Push vs. Git Push Origin

Everything About Git Push Command

To push the content from the local machine to the remote location, the “Git Push” command is used. Here, we have used the “Push” term for data transfer from the local machine to the remote machine. There is one more GIt command i.e. “Git Fetch”, the command is used with an objective of local transfer of contents. If you want to share any content remotely then Git Push command is used.

There is a process to configure remote repositories as well by using the “Git Remote” command. In simple words, Pushing means overwriting the existing content so you have to be extra careful when overwriting changes to a remote location. Here is the basic syntax of “of the command for your reference.

Git push <remote> <branch>

Look at the syntax carefully where we have added the command in the start, destination location at the second position and the name of the file saved on your local system that you want to overwrite to the remote location. Here, we have used the <remote> name for the destination location and the <branch> name for the file saved on the local system.

Sometimes, extra permissions are set by the developers to stop the unnecessary overwriting. If you are sure of changes that you want to commit them anyhow then add force flag in the end. It will make changes to the destination location even if changes are restricted.

Git push <remote> --force

With the example discussed above, we have learned to  transfer a selected file named <branch> available at the local system. It is right time getting little more advanced where you can transfer all files at once saved on the local machine. check the syntax below for the same purpose.

Git push <remote> --all

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This command will help in transferring all local files saved on your system but tags are not moved with local files. you must be wondering how to transfer tags along? Here is the syntax to help you with the problem.

Git push <remote> --tags

How does Git Push Command Work?

As we have discussed already, the “Git Push command” is suitable for uploading changes made to a local file to another file saved remotely. As soon as you have made some important changes to the file saved on your system, it is obvious you want to share changes with other people working on the same project. Here is the pictorial representation of the command to help you in understanding the concept deeply.

How does Git Push Command Work?

See the diagram carefully, how the local file has been shifted to the current original master after the final push. In brief, once the changes are saved successfully, content into the file saved on your system and the remote file will be the same.

About Git Remote Command

How does Git Push Command Work?

If you want to check how your current remote file is connected to other files, The “Git remote” command can be used. It helps in managing remote connections in all possible ways. In short, it is easy to access other remote file using a shortcut.

In the pictorial representation given above, we have shown remote connections with your personal repository. If required, you can access these repos quickly using shortcuts instead of using long URLs.

But the question is how to check connections of your repo with other repos. Here, we have the solution that will give you a complete list of connections at a single click.

Git remote

To list the URL for each remote connection, add the given command.

Git remote -v

For adding a new connection with your repo, you can use the following command:

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Git remote add <name> <url>

For removing a connection that you think not required anymore, add the given command:

Git remote rm<name>

For renaming a connection from the existing one to the newer one, add the given command.

Git remote rename <old-name> <new-name>

About Git Fetch Command

The “Git Fetch” command is used with an objective of local transfer of contents. Also, this command can be used to download the remote data to make sure what other users are doing. It will help you in analyzing the content of the central repo but it is necessary to combine with your existing content.

About Git Pull Command

With the Fetch command, the content is only downloaded not merged. if you want to merge the content then Pull command should be considered. It will download the content from the remote repo and merge the changes to the local file saved on your system. Basically, “Pull” command is a combination of fetch and merge commands where both operations are executed automatically. Here is the basic syntax for your reference.

Git pull <remote>

If you want to fetch the content but don’t want to merge changes to the local branch then you should use the following command:

Git pull –no-commit <remote>

To find the details which content has been downloaded and which content has been merged, you can use the following command:

Git pull --verbose

About Git Merge Command

As the name suggests, it allows taking content from multiple independent branches and merge changes to the desired file. Merge operation can be used along the checkout operation where desired changes are combined and obsolete changes are deleted.

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About Git Init command

This command is used for creating a new Git repo and perhaps the first command for your project. it can be used by anyone, even as a beginner. Here is the syntax for your understanding.

Git init

If you want to create a repo without any working directory then it can be done using the bare flag. This flag is added for safety purposes where your repo cannot be touched by any other user.

Git init –bare <directory>

Force Pushing

Sometimes, extra permissions are set by the developers to stop the unnecessary overwriting. If you are sure of changes that you want to commit them anyhow then add force flag in the end. It will make changes to the destination location even if changes are restricted.

Git push <remote> --force

With the example discussed above, we have learned to  transfer a selected file named <branch> available at the local system.

Git Push Command with Examples

Default Git Push

Till the tie, we have discussed all necessary commands that are frequently used when pushing content to the remote machine. Here is a set of commands that makes changes to the remote file and your local files are also up to date.

Git checkout master
Git fetch origin master
Git rebase –I origin/master
#Squash commits, fix up commit messages etc.
Git push origin master


Deleting a Remote Tag/Branch

it is common to delete the unnecessary content not needed anymore. it can be done at your local system or remote machine as per the requirement. Here is the example for the same.

Git branch –d branch_name
Git push origin : branch_name

Final Words:

With this blog, you must have a sound idea of Git commands and how they can be used for different purposes. You have to be very careful when adding flags or using multiple Git commands together otherwise, it will create issues later. The best idea is to join the Git certification program with us and explore your learning base right away. We have the world-class mentors to train you that ensure life-changing experiences for our learners. We wish you luck for a successful Git career with us.

    Janbask Training

    JanBask Training is a leading Global Online Training Provider through Live Sessions. The Live classes provide a blended approach of hands on experience along with theoretical knowledge which is driven by certified professionals.


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